All or nothing.

Our ‘general’ workouts are designed to target your hot-spots so you’ll find a good balance of cardio, strength, endurance and recovery in each one.

Aim for 3 sets of each exercise in the order that they appear and try to avoid resting until the whole section is complete. You can do it!

For more detailed instruction on how to approach your workout, click on the training guides below.

Your Program Guide:

How many should I do of each exercise?

How long should I wait before I start the next exercise?

Should I repeat each exercise?

How will I know when I’ve done enough?

What if I don’t have any equipment?

 

Isn’t it nicer to be woken up gently rather than a bucket of cold water in the face?
When it comes to exercise, treat your body with the same courtesy and it will thank you in the long-run!

A sufficient warm-up should leave you breathless but able to complete a spoken sentence.

For those of you who like to push it, be patient, there’s plenty of opportunity in your Main Course!

Reps = repetitions - how many times you repeat a movement.

Sets = an entire block of reps

The *Overload Principle = to achieve overload, your last 2 reps should require maximum effort.

*Beyond the point of exhaustion, any more than 2 reps isn’t overload, it’s ‘working to failure’, or; ‘beasting it’ and we DO NOT recommend that. Life’s too short and you are far too precious!

For those who need a gentle start, the Knees-up will slowly prime your legs, glutes and lower back in preparation for the more strenuous movements coming up in this program.

*No video; yet. Please see Method tab for instructions.

 

Start from a neutral standing position (feet hip distance apart).

  1. Raise your right knee high towards your left elbow.
  2. Return to neutral.
  3. Raise your left knee towards your right elbow.
  4. Repeat with a fluid motion to complete the set.

 

  • Heart
  • Glutes
  • Lower back
  • Shoulder girdle

1st set: Maximum 20 (counting only one knee).

2nd set: 16

3rd set: 16

Not available; yet…

A variation on the standard jumping jacks but with a little less impact on the leg and hip joints.

*See Video tab

 

  1. Start with legs wide apart and raise your elbows to shoulder height.
  2. With a light jump, land to place your right foot across your left.
  3. Return to a wide jack and, as you do so, pull your elbows back as far as they want to go (this will open up your chest muscles).
  4. Repeat the action, only this time, land to place your left foot across your right.
  5. Repeat with a fluid motion to complete the set.

*See video demonstration

Compound, ie, everywhere (including the heart.

1st set: aim for 20 (or your personal overload maximum).
2nd set: 16 (or 4 less than your 1st set).
3rd set: 16 (or as above).

There aren’t many areas of the body that don’t get a workout from this compound movement.

*See Method and Video tab for instructions

  1. Start in a wide-legged position with feet turned outwards.
  2. Bend both knees into a wide squat position, at the same time fold from the hip and tag your right hand to your left heel - keep both knees bent otherwise you’ll be in a Side-Lunge.
  3. Keeping your feet in place, stand tall and clap your hands overhead
  4. Repeat the folded squat, but this time, tag your left hand to your right heel
  5. Gather momentum and enjoy!

*For variations, see video demonstration.

Everywhere!
In particular, legs, heart, lower back and shoulders.

1st set: aim for 20 (or your personal overload maximum).
2nd set: 16 (or 4 less than your 1st set).
3rd set: 16 (or as above).

*Remember, this is your warm-up. Keep it light!

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Have 2 Minutes of Active Recovery

Drink some water! Have a 2-minute read.

Now that you’ve warmed up, your body should feel ready for action.

Rule Number 1: Relax! Fear or trepidation will literally tighten your muscles and that’s when injuries occur.
Remember, your body is doing exactly what it’s designed to do for your good health so relax your mind and let the magic happen!

It’s time to work up a sweat!

Reps = repetitions - how many times you repeat a movement.

Sets = an entire block of reps

The Overload Principle = to achieve overload, your last 2 reps should require maximum effort.

*Beyond the point of exhaustion, any more than 2 reps isn’t overload, it’s ‘working to failure’, or; ‘beasting it’ and we DO NOT recommend that. Life’s too short and you are far too precious!

A nice progression from the Knees-Up that will also add a challenge to your balance.

*See video demonstration for variations on this movement.

 

  1. Perform this movement as you did the Knees-up, only this time, complete your set on the same supporting leg.
  2. Instead of returning your working leg to a neutral stand, extend it to the rear then swing the knee back to repeat the action.

*See video demonstration for variations

 

 

  • Hip Flexors
  • Heart
  • Lower back.
  • Hamstrings
  • Glutes

Maximum: 20 (same leg)

2nd set: 16

3rd set: 16

 These explosive movements require lots of stamina and give those leg muscles a real going over. Not for the faint-hearted!

*See video demonstration for variations

 

  1. Begin with feet in a wide tandem stance (one in front of the other, about one-foot distance).
  2. Spring into the air.
  3. Land in the Get-Set position
  4. Repeat to complete your set

*If you need to make it easier, forget the Get-Set position and simply land with soft knees before repeating.

  • Heart
  • Quads
  • Hamstrings
  • Glutes

1st set: aim for 20 (or you personal overload.
2nd set: 16 (or 4 less than your 1st set).
3rd set: 16 (or as above).

Not available; yet…

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Well Done, YOU!

Have 2 minutes of active rest, neck some water then hit the ground for your core section.

Where’s my core? When referring to the core, many people (including trainers) often point to the tummy. There’s a logic to that, but really your core muscles are the ones which stabilise the spine so they cover a much wider area.

Starting from the pelvis, your core region runs from your hips all the way up the spine and, because our thigh bones are attached to the pelvis; all the way down to our knees as well.
This is evidenced when we kneel. Our glutes fire-up and after a spell, there’s a noticeable contraction in the buttocks.

Reps = repetitions - how many times you repeat a movement.

Sets = an entire block of reps

The Overload Principle = to achieve overload, your last 2 reps should require maximum effort.

*Beyond the point of exhaustion, any more than 2 reps isn’t overload, it’s ‘working to failure’, or; ‘beasting it’ and we DO NOT recommend that. Life’s too short and you are far too precious!

Personal Trainers and Coaches don’t always agree but most will agree that the Supine Cycle is the Daddy of all abdominal conditioners!

*A video demonstration is available but, for more detailed instruction, read Method tab.

The idea is to peddle your legs while lying on your back.

Teaching points:

  1.  Lying on your back, fix your gaze straight ahead (if it helps, imagine holding a raw egg between your chin and chest - try not to crush it!).
  2. Raise your right knee while bringing your left shoulder towards it - keep hold of that egg!
  3. Repeat the same movement with your left knee and right shoulder

*Tip: The further you straighten your leg after each crunch, the more you’ll engage your abs AND; the slower the better!

  • Obliques - internal & external
  • Rectus Abdominus (the 6-pack muscle)
  • Transverse Abdominus (major core abdominal)
  • Quadratus Lumborum

Aim for 32 - counting only one knee

*By the time you get to 16, 32 might seem impossible but I bet you can do it!

Let’s pay some special attention to the derriere!
This movement works the glutes as well as the rest of the core complex.

*See video demonstration

 

  1. Begin lying on your back
  2. Draw your heels as far as they’ll come, to the outside of your hips
  3. Starting from your coccyx, raise your hips as high as they’ll go; then a bit further!
  4. Once you’re stable, keep both knees aligned as you extend one leg, return it to the bridge position, then the other

*See video demonstration

  • Glutes
  • Quads
  • Core complex

1st set: aim for 10 (or you personal overload), counting only your right knee - in other words; 40.
2nd set: 10 (or 4 less than your 1st set).

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Time To Cool Down!

Your Reward!

A thorough cooldown is one of the most crucial elements of training. It helps your body recover and, in the long-term, will allow you to get more out of each session.

Advantages to regular stretching include:

  • Muscle & joint repair
  • Improved range of movement (flexibility).
  • It feels nice and you deserve that!

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